The spare parts of the Corona Railyard

Known to most insiders as "The Barn", the Corona Railyard serves as the home yard of the IRT Flushing Line 7.  It is located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park near Citi Field, the National Tennis Center, and the site of the 1939 and 1964 World's Fairs. Corona Yard opened in 1928 and maintains the R188s and R62AS used on the 7 line. It also contains the Casey Stengel Bus Depot. (We'll save the details about the Casey Stengel Bus Depot for another day, another post.) While most of the photographers who come to the Corona Railyard look to shoot the wide angle view of the many trains lined up side to side, lately I am starting to find intrigue in the outlying sections of the railyard. The sections of the railyard that feature the trains old rusty abandoned pieces, as well as the newer shiny colorfully packaged train parts, yet to be installed. There is something visually pleasing to the eye when you contrast these old brown and new blue parts, amongst other industrial knick knacks, against the gray gravel backdrop of the railyard floor. Throw in some shadows, and add some key light that ALWAYS seem to drop down into the depths of this spot,  no matter what time of day, and you get some really interesting images. Curiosity always gets me though. What part was taken from what part of the 7 train? What new piece still in wrapping, will serve in making the 7 train faster? And on a different level who decides on how these items are arranged so haphazardly on the ground? Hopefully, I will take a tour soon, to get some of these questions answered, but in the meantime, I have fun wondering. So the next time you come out to the Corona Railyard, trying to chase the perfect sunset light to bounce off the top of those mammoth silver cars, think about moving your lens behind the light and into the shadows, you might find something you never knew existed. words and photo by Adolfo Steve Vazquez facts via Wikipedia.com  

Known to most insiders as "The Barn", the Corona Railyard serves as the home yard of the IRT Flushing Line 7.  It is located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park near Citi Field, the National Tennis Center, and the site of the 1939 and 1964 World's Fairs.

Corona Yard opened in 1928 and maintains the R188s and R62AS used on the 7 line. It also contains the Casey Stengel Bus Depot. (We'll save the details about the Casey Stengel Bus Depot for another day, another post.)

While most of the photographers who come to the Corona Railyard look to shoot the wide angle view of the many trains lined up side to side, lately I am starting to find intrigue in the outlying sections of the railyard. The sections of the railyard that feature the trains old rusty abandoned pieces, as well as the newer shiny colorfully packaged train parts, yet to be installed. There is something visually pleasing to the eye when you contrast these old brown and new blue parts, amongst other industrial knick knacks, against the gray gravel backdrop of the railyard floor. Throw in some shadows, and add some key light that ALWAYS seem to drop down into the depths of this spot,  no matter what time of day, and you get some really interesting images.

Curiosity always gets me though. What part was taken from what part of the 7 train? What new piece still in wrapping, will serve in making the 7 train faster? And on a different level who decides on how these items are arranged so haphazardly on the ground? Hopefully, I will take a tour soon, to get some of these questions answered, but in the meantime, I have fun wondering.

So the next time you come out to the Corona Railyard, trying to chase the perfect sunset light to bounce off the top of those mammoth silver cars, think about moving your lens behind the light and into the shadows, you might find something you never knew existed.

words and photo by Adolfo Steve Vazquez facts via Wikipedia.com